What's your nutritious, weekday breakfast?

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  • Yes, avocados come in several varieties. When they come from California, most are pretty much the same size. Those from Mexico or South America will vary. I must assume COM is talking about only the meat? Even so, you are off by about 60g. All of mine are 95-100g per half, meat only and weighed on a digital scale. BTW, they are expensive. $2 each.

  • Hello @gearup328_2619 ,

    Our values are per edible portion, so that would mean without the skin and pits for fruits that we would normally remove the peel before eating. For avocados, the nutritional values are for the flesh only, seeing as the skin and seeds are not consumed by the majority of people.

    The nutritional values for Avocados are sourced from the NCCDB, and are meant to represent the average values from what is consumed and available in the United States. The size of an avocado can vary from one unit to another depending on the variety, origin and season.

    The best way to track accurately your nutrition is to weigh out the portion you are eating and enter in your serving size as a gram amount in Cronometer.

    We have a great blog post that you might like to check out that explains how to get more accurate nutrition information using Cronometer.

    https://cronometer.com/blog/6-tips-getting-nutrition-data/

    Cheers,

    Marie-Eve
    cronometer.com
    As always, any and all postings here are covered by our T&Cs:
    https://forums.cronometer.com/discussion/27/governing-terms-and-disclaimer

  • One of my favorite breakfast is a mix of cereals, seeds and fruits. The recipe is made by me. I started with only oatmeal and water and I worked on it, trying many ingredients, until I get to perfection ! :smiley: When I eat this I'm feeling very well and satiated.

    The recipe is as follows:

    1. Put in a bowl...
    • 3 tbsp Oat Flakes (25g)
    • 4 tsp Chia Seeds (13g)
    • 2 heaping tsp Pumpkin Seeds (12g)
    • 2 heaping tsp Sunflower Seeds (11g)
    • 2 heaping tsp Goji Berries (9g)
    • 2 heaping tsp Raisins (12g)
    1. Pour half a cup of water (110 g) over them and mix thoroughly.

    2. Meanwhile, until the seeds absorb all the water (about 10 min), just finely chop the following:

    • 2 Dates (10g)
    • 2 Dried Prunes (12g)
    • 4 Walnuts (21g)
    • 1/2 Banana (67g)
    • 1 small Apple (110g)
    1. Put them in the bowl too and mix everything well.

    2. Finally add some coconut flakes on top and enjoy it at the computer (browsing Cronometer forum :smiley: ) because it's a lot of crunching. It takes me 20 minutes to eat all this.

    3. After you've finished eating, don't forget to drink a cup of wather to avoid having problems with the stomach from the fiber.

    728 kcal, 18g protein, 37g fat (4g Omega3 and 8g saturated), 72g carbs, 20g fiber

    I apologise for my misspellings, as English is not my native language.

  • @Marus

    Looks yummy!!

    Marie-Eve
    cronometer.com
    As always, any and all postings here are covered by our T&Cs:
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  • Yes, indeed ! :smiley:

    But something make me think... I read on the internet that... "Seeds, nuts and grains are covered by protective substances called enzyme inhibitors that prevent premature germination and ensures that the nutrients necessary for growth are preserved. When consumed as such, these enzyme inhibitors reduce the absorption of important minerals and vitamins, leading to nutritional deficiencies or other health problems."
    Do you think should I warry ? :/

    I apologise for my misspellings, as English is not my native language.

  • Marus, you don't mention sugar. There is a ton of sugar in your breakfast. 728 calories? Are you kidding? For breakfast? Please show us your diary with this recipe.

  • Most mornings its eggs fried in ghee and sprinkled with salt pepper and smoked paprika, but sometimes its quick keto pancakes: blend 3 eggs, 3 oz cream cheese, 1 tsp cinnamon and 10 drops stevia (I use vanilla cream sweet leaf). After blending pour on a griddle like regular pancake batter. Recipe scales well for more servings.

  • edited May 2018

    @gearup328_2619
    What is the problem with sugar ? There is no added sugar in my recipe, only from fruits. It's not ok to eat fruits ? I understand that sugar from fruits doesn't rise so much the blod glucose because it came packed with fiber and is gradually absorbed. Please correct me if I'm wrong.
    The recommended intake for carbs (AMDR) is 45-65% of total energy. I chose 50% (292g) for my target but most of the time I'm under this limit. I don't eat or drink added sugar at all (maybe just at my birthday), so my carbs must came from somewhere. I think fruits it's the best choice.
    I eat 3 meals a day. So 3 x 700 kcal = 2100 kcal, close to my target of 2300 kcal.
    I am 37 years old, 75 kg and 181 cm. :smile:

    This is the diary you requested (contains just this breakfast):
    (right click on the image and chose "View Image" for bigger resolution)

    I apologise for my misspellings, as English is not my native language.

  • The poster questioning your diet and numbers etc was just plain rude-you did not owe him the courtesy of responding with your diet. Shame on him. You are correct that the glycemic load is lower for fructose because the fiber makes it slower to digest (this wouldn't apply to juices).

    I hadn't heard that about nuts, grains, and legumes before-I don't eat grains or legumes but do eat a fair amount of nuts :( I'll have to see if roasted nuts still have the anti-nutrirent enzyme (I'm hoping not) and I'll stop eating the raw almonds. thanks for the info.

    "I've never considered excessive sanity a virtue" Mike Uris, San Antonio Express-News, 2002

  • gearup328_2619 April 26

    Half an avocado 95g, One soft boiled organic egg. Ham (uncured) or turkey 85g. Fresh ground coffee black, two cups. That's it. The avocado is totally inaccurate on COM. I halve and remove the skin/seed and weigh.

    How do you keep the remaining half from browning? I always have to scrape my halves.

    Pillage, then burn.

    The world is richer when you turn enemies into friends, but that's not the same as you being richer.

  • Marus, the problem with eating a lot of fruit is that the fructose goes straight to the liver. Modern fruits should probably be called Frankenfruits, because they are bred specifically for sweetnes and add too much fructose and sugar for our bodies to handle safeley. They don't spike blood sugar as much because of all the fructose they contain, so we think they are more OK. This is probably why so many women are getting fatty liver disease which is a non alcoholic version of cyrrhosis of the liver. Its also why people who follow a lower carb WOE tend to restrict their fruit intake.

  • 504--I use plastic wrap and put it on so there is no air. I either peel a half or just scoop it out. Scooping is difficult with a hard fruit. Better to peel and slice. I only buy really hard fruit. I think it tastes better.
    Only peel the half you eat. Leave the skin on the one you don't eat right away. Remove the seed. Some folks will squeeze lemon juice and this also helps. I eat the second half the next day. Love my avocados :):)

  • edited May 2018

    Comanchesue--
    "The poster questioning your diet and numbers etc was just plain rude-you did not owe him the courtesy of responding with your diet. Shame on him".

    Sorry if I came across that way. I am only raising the question of so much sugar--no matter where it comes from. I am happy that Marus posted his breakfast. His sugar intake is all glucose and fructose from fruits. I notice he has no set limit on sugar. He has a limit on carbs. Sugar will be factored into those carbs. My sugar limit is 25g/day. He gets 44g just for breakfast. I also have a 100g/day limit for carbs. He has already eaten net carbs of 72g just for breakfast. Each to their own. What works for him is just fine with me. I didn't mean to be critical---just curious. Marus was very nice to post.

    I don't know how to post just my breakfast but it's very simple to enter what I have already posted. It's a light breakfast and many days I combine it with lunch.

    I'm a believer in veggies, not fruits. Kale, Broccoli, Cauliflower, Tomatoes, Brussels Sprouts, Spinach, Bak Choi, Parsley (Tabouli), carrots, peppers and many others. I need to mention I buy organic if at all possible. Hey, whatever makes you happy. :):)

  • edella--you are right on. We really don't need sugar. Cancer thrives in a high sugar environment. Matters not where you are getting it. Worst will be from "added" sugar that is in every packaged food. Why are our kids at 10YO getting fatty livers? SUGAR. This was unheard of 50 years ago.

  • 504

    If you leave the pit in the second 1/2 until you use it, it won't go brown. Then wrap in plastic wrap or a baggie and refrigerate.

  • @gearup328_2619
    I am new to "healty eating". I study nutrition only for 5 months, so I may not know it all. :smile: But in the science books that I read, from official sources, they say that Acceptable Macronutrient Distribution Ranges (AMDR) for carbs are 45-65% of total energy. So, if didn't cross that line, why should I worry ? If they say that it's ok I think it is. These carbs, that a person can eat, are composed mostly of simple sugars and starches. If I don't eat sugars, what should I eat, only starches ? :smile:

    You said that "We really don't need sugar". But the scientists believe we need it, because the glucose is the fuel of the central nervous system and red blood cells, and it can not be made from fat.
    "Amino acids and glycerol can be converted to pyruvate and therefore can provide glucose for the body. Fatty acids are converted to acetyl CoA and therefore cannot make glucose. Acetyl CoA can readily make fat. Whereas most of the body’s cells can use glucose, fat, or both for energy, the body must have glucose to fuel the activities of the central nervous system and red blood cells. Without glucose from food, the body will break down its own lean (proteincontaining) tissue to get the amino acids needed to make glucose. To protect this protein tissue, the body needs foods that provide glucose—primarily carbohydrate. Eating only fat provides abundant acetyl CoA, but forces the body to break down protein tissue to make glucose. Eating only protein requires the body to convert protein to glucose. Clearly, the best diet provides ample carbohydrate (45 to 65 percent of kcalories), adequate protein (10 to 35 percent of kcalories), and some fat (20 to 35 percent of kcalories)."

    @edella
    Indeed, eating a lot of fructose is not good, but do you think that a small apple and a half of banana it's a lot ? :smile:
    After I read your comment I searched with Google for the "fructose and liver" and in this page (from Hardvard Medical School) I found, they say that fructose is bad, but they say again at the bottom of the page that.... "It's worth cutting back on fructose. But don't do it by giving up fruit. Fruit is good for you and is a minor source of fructose for most people. The big sources are refined sugar and high-fructose corn syrup.".

    @Susan_RD_101 , what do you think about this ? :wink:

    I apologise for my misspellings, as English is not my native language.

  • @Marus

    Thanks for looping me in!

    Fruit contains ~60 calories per serving and is chocked full of vitamins and antioxidants. Clinical practice guidelines (based on peer-reviewed meta-analyses and systematic review) advocate for an increased intake of fruits, vegetables, and other unprocessed plant food for the protection of many chronic diseases.

    What Google nutrition sometimes misses is that it is perfectly fine for your blood sugar to increase; the problem is that sometimes there is a glitch in our physiology and we aren't able to produce enough insulin (or insulin that is effective) to bring the sugar into our blood stream.

    An issue I take with people (and especially doctors) touting the dangers of eating fruit is that it doesn't show up in scientific evidence. When healthy people eat +++ fruit, they don't gain weight nor succumb to health issues, provided that calories are kept balanced. If fruit really was problematic, it should be problematic for all humans sharing similar genetic material. And while for some people (i.e. those with T2DM) may have a rise in blood sugar if they eat too much fruit at once, losing weight (if needed), eating a balanced diet, and engaging in physical activity helps the body to better process fruit.

    Working with those with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), I have never seen an increase in liver enzymes with inclusion of fruit. In fact, values typically lower with the inclusion of more fruits and vegetables.

    The bottom line is that we, as humans, appear able to digest vastly different diets. The best diet will be the one that you can follow for the rest of your life. From a global perspective, I am definitely in favour of eating more plant-based given the sustainability issues that food production faces. :)

    Hope this helps!

    Susan Macfarlane, MScA, RD
    Registered Dietitian Nutritionist
    cronometer.com
    As always, any and all postings here are covered by our T&Cs:
    https://forums.cronometer.com/discussion/27/governing-terms-and-disclaimer

  • edited May 2018

    Susan, thanks for clarifying that ! :smile:
    Even if I were born in the woods, and I would never have had access to scientific data, I would never have thought that the fruits are bad. :smiley: It's something made by nature, it can't be bad. All the living beings are eating plant-based. It's the foundation of life !
    Of course, any good food in excess can be bad.

    I apologise for my misspellings, as English is not my native language.

  • Marus, I only stated that your breakfast really had a lot of sugar. Actually, enough for three days and that's only your breakfast. What about the other two meals you say you have. . Cut back on sugar and replace it with other low sugar plant foods.

    COM will sometimes over analyze nutrition. It almost takes the fun out of eating.
    You haven't mentioned organic. Go organic in everything. It's not perfect but better than non organic. Some of the foods in your breakfast are heavily sprayed with chemicals. Apples in particular.

  • Another great breakfast, which I just ate. :smiley: Most veggies are from my own garden. The bread is also home mede from whole wheat. Since I discovered it, I love to eat chickpeas with anything !

    Ingredients:

    • cow cheese
    • turkey breast
    • red bell peppers
    • green peppers
    • cucumber
    • parsley
    • chickpeas
    • green garlic
    • whole wheat bread

    Approximately...

    I apologise for my misspellings, as English is not my native language.

  • Looks delicious. Most calories come from the peas, bread and cheese. I also love dairy--cheese, milk and yogurt. You didn't mention the green onion, which I love. Is the green garlic that long thin veggie?

  • Yes, that from the left. It is the whole plant of the garlic. When it's young and green it's edible. I name it "green garlic" but I'm not verry sure that's what it's called in English. In Cronometer database there is no such food for the whole garlic plant, only for the garlic cloves (that white part of the garlic).
    I love onions too, but those I prefer in salad.

    I apologise for my misspellings, as English is not my native language.

  • I grow that garlic. It is just garlic that is harvested early, before it becomes a real garlic. It has a taste like an onion mixed with garlic. I called them garlions. Onions and garlic are close relatives as are scallions, leeks and chives. They are all very good for you.

  • That looks like a very balanced plate @Marus - dietitian approved!

    P.S. Cool place mats!

    Susan Macfarlane, MScA, RD
    Registered Dietitian Nutritionist
    cronometer.com
    As always, any and all postings here are covered by our T&Cs:
    https://forums.cronometer.com/discussion/27/governing-terms-and-disclaimer

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