Brown Rice calories

When I attempted to add uncooked brown rice, It gave me an incredibly high number, no matter which entry I chose. It gave me 679 calories. On MFP, it is 216, and on the USDA web site, it shows 218 calories. Why is it 4 times the amount here?

I'm trying to be healthy, and loose weight, so I still do have to watch my calories. Just trying to be accurate.

Comments

  • Hi @Dreamer1215 , Our nutritional values for 'Brown Rice, Uncooked' are sourced from the NCCDB which has compiled results from different lab analyses and research papers to provide us with a comprehensive nutrient profile. This listing shows 367kcal per 100g of uncooked rice.

    Hilary
    cronometer.com
    As always, any and all postings here are covered by our T&Cs:
    https://forums.cronometer.com/discussion/27/governing-terms-and-disclaimer

  • cooked rice from the NCCDB has a comparable calorie rating? are you sure MFP, and USDA weren't cooked?

    I am an amateur. I've been using CRON-O-Meter for 9 years and still learning.....

  • The listings for NCCDB and USDA cooked brown rice indicate 123 kcal per 100g of cooked rice, while the uncooked listing shows 367kcal per 100g uncooked rice (Dry). This data has compiled results from different lab analyses and research papers to provide us with a comprehensive nutrient profile. You can learn more about Cronometer's data sources here: https://cronometer.com/help/foods/#data

    Hilary
    cronometer.com
    As always, any and all postings here are covered by our T&Cs:
    https://forums.cronometer.com/discussion/27/governing-terms-and-disclaimer

  • I looked on the back of the brown rice package itself, and it says 160 cals for 3/4 cup. It really gets confusing when a person is trying to do the right thing.

  • If your priority is to log foods exactly as the nutrition facts appear on the package, I would recommend using the barcode scanner feature on the mobile app or entering the bar code number into the search bar on the Web version. If you cannot find the corresponding nutrition information, you can create a custom food and enter the nutrition information manually as seen on your foods packaging, and save the data in your custom foods to easily enter it again the next time you eat the food. When creating a custom food, you can submit it for publishing to our public database for use by you and other users later!
    We recently released a blog post about how to choose the best data for your needs here: https://cronometer.com/blog/6-tips-getting-nutrition-data/
    If your priority is to get the most detailed information for a food, I recommend choosing entries from the NCCDB in the Common Foods Tab. The NCCDB and USDA databases have compiled results from different lab analyses and research papers to provide us with a comprehensive nutrient profile. These numbers may be slightly different than Packaging values to to rounding of volume of the product and/or nutrients on food labels.

    Hilary
    cronometer.com
    As always, any and all postings here are covered by our T&Cs:
    https://forums.cronometer.com/discussion/27/governing-terms-and-disclaimer

  • I stopped eating rice regularly just because it's so confusing to log. The brand of rice I use doesn't even say if the weight on the nutrient panel is cooked or dry/raw xD Too hard, so I eat rice only once a month (if that) and have cauliflower instead. It's not the same, but I'm lazy

    #moredotsthanadalmatian

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