Some questions about meat

Hi,
Is there a difference between roasts and chops of a pork loin ?
English is not my native language, and I don't understand very well what "roasts" and "chops" means. They seems almost the same comparing nutrient profile...
The exact foods are:
Pork, fresh, loin, center rib (roasts), bone-in, separable lean and fat, cooked, roasted
Pork, fresh, loin, center rib (chops), bone-in, separable lean and fat, cooked, pan-fried

I apologise for my misspellings, as English is not my native language.

Comments

  • edited August 4

    Is there a difference between roasts and chops of a pork loin?

    A bone-in pork loin roast will have several ribs.

    A bone-in pork chop will usually include one rib.

    Additionally, the word "roast" means to cook (food, especially meat) by prolonged exposure to heat in an oven or over a fire. "Roast" is also used to refer to a cut of meat that is usually or often cooked by roasting.
    And "pan-fried" means, you guessed it, fried in a pan. :p

    "Eat food, not too much, mostly plants." Michael Pollan

  • So... it's the same piece of meat but cuted into slices.

    By the way, "pan-fried" uses oil ? Like when you make some french fries ? Or it's just fried in the pan without no oil ?

    I apologise for my misspellings, as English is not my native language.

  • Pan-frying uses oil, oil and butter, or some other kind of fat.

    French fries are deep-fried meaning the potatoes are completely submerged in hot oil.

    A pork chop would be "shallow-fried." The oil would not go more than one-third up the side of the chop. Most people would use less than that though, maybe as little as a teaspoon or two of oil in a 9-inch pan.

    Hope that helps.

    "Eat food, not too much, mostly plants." Michael Pollan

  • Thanks !
    Another question. Loin blade is the same thing as shoulder blade ? In google pictures they seems to be from the same place...

    I apologise for my misspellings, as English is not my native language.

  • edited August 4

    Yeah. It gets confusing for me because everybody doesn't use the same names. Especially in different countries. The hunk of meat that includes the shoulder blade and the meat directly above it is usually called a Boston Butt. The meat below the blade usually called a shoulder roast or picnic roast seems to me to be the top part of a hogs front leg. But whatever you call it is a tougher piece of meat with more fat and connective tissue than the loin. For that reason, it is usually slow-roasted or braised, sometimes in a smoker, barbeque with indirect heat, slow-cooker or crockpot.

    Cooked properly a Boston Butt is my favorite part of the hog.

    "Eat food, not too much, mostly plants." Michael Pollan

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