OXALATES

IS THERE A WAY THAT WE CAN TRACK THESE IN THE FOODS LIKE WE DO FOR MINERALS / VITAMINS... IT WOULD TRULY BE HELPFUL FOR US WHO ARE PRONED TO GETTING KIDNEY STONES.

Comments

  • I have heard that Harvard has the go to list on oxylates. I refer to an app called oxylator

  • The best source i've seen is, of all places, on the FB, TLO group (TLO=Trying Low Oxalates)

  • It would be a shame, and I'm not sure it makes sense, to avoid all foods that contain oxalates. That being said, I do avoid the worst offenders, spinach and beets. But I enjoy grains after soaking and cooking them, which reduces oxalate content quite a bit. Legumes, too, especially if you buy canned, already have reduced levels as they've been cooked. Nuts I mostly don't bother soaking, except almonds. It's a lot of work after a while.

  • Thanks for help on oxalates. TLO group does have useful info especially on foods high in oxalates. I understand that oxalate content varies somewhat for a given veggie/seed/nut. In general I stay with low to moderate oxalate veggies, seeds, and nuts. no grains/legumes at all for me. no fruit except avocado. typically take 500 mg calcium citrate with meals to help bind with oxalates in the food with that meal. quasi carnivore I guess.

  • I guess my feeling is that you're eliminating a lot of high-quality foods by avoiding those with oxalates. it's like throwing the baby out with the bath water.

  • Would you be able to provide values for PHOSPHATES separately from PHOSPHORUS? Phosphates are inorganic versions of phosphorus and are associated with hypertension and renal damage. Right now Cronometer just tracks phosphorus. Are you including phosphates as part of phosphorus?

  • Hi @Jeanne_D_RD

    Minerals in foods are reported as the total content found in a food, so they have not separated out the types/sources of phosphrus.

    Karen Stark
    cronometer.com
    As always, any and all postings here are covered by our T&Cs:
    https://forums.cronometer.com/discussion/27/governing-terms-and-disclaimer

  • Exciting news! Oxalates are now trackable in Cronometer. Read our blog for more info: https://cronometer.com/blog/cronometer-tracks-oxalates/

  • What is a good score for oxylates. Right now the meter is pointing to the 4 ?

  • Aim for a calcium:oxalate ratio of 4:3 and above in the, in other words get a little more calcium than oxalate in a meal. Outside of meals particularly high in oxalate, meeting your Recommended Daily Allowance for calcium is likely enough to offset negative effects of oxalates in your diet (1000-1200 mg calcium per day for adults).

    Karen Stark
    cronometer.com
    As always, any and all postings here are covered by our T&Cs:
    https://forums.cronometer.com/discussion/27/governing-terms-and-disclaimer

  • Thought yea…finally…then tried to use it. Rye bread does not show any oxalates (has 7mg per slice) and cannot add coffee to my foods because your app requires weight and will not accept ounces.

  • The oxalate issue sounds like an argument for consuming modest amounts of each of a wide variety of foods. This reduces your risk of overdosing on any one thing.

    The oxalate in spinach shouldn't be an issue if you eat just a small amount every day or eat it sporadically. On the other hand, trying to be Popeye would greatly increase your risk.

  • edited June 2

    Oxalates are the primary contributor to the most common kind of kidney stones, which cause extreme pain and major healthcare costs to 10-15% of the population. They often recur, and balancing oxalates and calcium in foods we eat is critical as one way to try to prevent recurrence. So that's why people are interested and THE reason that I'm trying and probably switching to Cronometer.

    It's also a plus and related that it tracks magnesium and calcium and that the Gold version tracks the balance of the two.

    THANK YOU to the developers and staff.

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