Avacado omega 6 to omega 3 ratios

One of the primary reasons, as a cardiac patient concerned about inflammation, that I started to use CronoMeter was to track my micronutrients with an emphasis on keeping my omega 3and omega 6 as close to 1:1 as possible. I have always been told, and read, that avacado were a great source for omega 3. However, the CronoMeter system reflects avacado as having .28 grams of Omega 3 to 4.8 grams of mega 6. This is more like a 0:5 or a 1:5 ratio with 6 being the predominant omega fat. But, as you can see below, from a web source (one of many) that I use for reference and example, the ratio is more like 7mg of threes to 1mg of sixes, 7:1. I am wondering which is correct. I chose the nccdb avacado for my selection. The Florida Green. Has anyone else come across this. Was going to post as a bug, but want to be sure that I am not simply overlooking an obvious point before I submit as a bug. Any insight is appreciated. Take care and have a great day. 👍🤠

Avocados
7mg Omega 3 per 1mg Omega 6
14% AI (223mg) Omega 3s per avocado
Calories: 322 | Weight: 201g (7.1oz)
Nutrition Facts for Avocados.

Comments

  • @wadegrimm

    The reference you shared does seem a bit inaccurate... The nutrient database that I prefer (and trust) is USDA and based on this information, 1 avocado has 0.2 g of omega 3 fats and 3.4 g of omega 6 fats.

    I'm not sure if you read this blog on Omega 3: 6 https://cronometer.com/blog/understanding-cronometers-nutrient-ratios/, but it may be useful. As mentioned, although we should be aware of our ratio of omega 3 to 6, we should also ensure that minimum values are being met and that we are including a source of the long-chain omega 3 fats, EPA and DHA (found in algae and fish that eat algae).

    Hope this helps!

    Susan Macfarlane, MScA, RD
    Registered Dietitian Nutritionist
    cronometer.com
    As always, any and all postings here are covered by our T&Cs:
    https://forums.cronometer.com/discussion/27/governing-terms-and-disclaimer

  • Hi wadegrimm,

    According to the analyzed values reported by NCCDB, the green skin avocados have a lower amount of omega-3 fatty acids when compared with black skin avocados.

    When comparing a 100 g serving of each:

    The USDA Food Composition Database has similar values as well. They provide references for all their values as well, in the Full Nutrient Report. https://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/search/list

    Best,

    Karen Stark
    cronometer.com
    As always, any and all postings here are covered by our T&Cs:
    https://forums.cronometer.com/discussion/27/governing-terms-and-disclaimer

  • Okay, so I guess I can not eat avacado anymore. My world is getting tougher every day. I am not allowed to eat much fat, but if I eat anything, my omega six goes way up and in order to match the omega threes I have to eat a ton of fish oil gels plus real fish. Now I am eating way too much fat. So confusing. I will talk to my Cardiologist Dr Gundry to see what to do. 🤔😩😜😜👍🤠

  • Obviously I'm not your doctor, but I would be quite surprised if your cardiologist would advise you against eating avocados. Yes they are high in omega 6: omega 3 ratio, but the predominant fatty acid is monounsaturated, the super healthy kind. I've never heard anyone claim that avocado is a good source of omega 3...

    #AllTheDots

  • @wadegrimm

    I love cardiologists! But sometimes they haven't spent a lot of time studying nutrition and tend to relay information from personal experience or what the media reports. While I don't know how much nutrition training your cardiologist received, I am certain he/she wouldn't ask you to avoid avocados!

    As more evidence on heart disease comes out, we are learning that the total dietary pattern, rather than individual nutrients, is more important for preventing heart disease.

    A simple message for heart disease (or any other disease for that matter) is:

    • Eat mostly plants
    • Choose unprocessed foods
    • Limit restaurant meals
    • Avoid foods high in trans and saturated fat (ask your MD if you should avoid cholesterol - I generally find doing so helps to lower blood cholesterol further)
    • Exercise regularly
    • Manage stress

    Healthy eating shouldn't be complicated... Nor should we spend all of our time and energy worrying about what to eat. :smiley:

    Kind regards,

    Susan Macfarlane, MScA, RD
    Registered Dietitian Nutritionist
    cronometer.com
    As always, any and all postings here are covered by our T&Cs:
    https://forums.cronometer.com/discussion/27/governing-terms-and-disclaimer

  • I appreciate your feedback. My cardiologist is Dr Gundry, and he has an emphasis on Diet and nutrition to prevent heart issues verse simply repairing the plumbing. So, I think he is dialed in and yes, would probably say do not stop avacado or hemp. But I have anyway, until I get a clear answer. I have written him a letter for his advice as well. I also suggested that he partner with you guys to possibly augment his practice. I will let you know about his avacado response when I hear back. Thank you for your very valid input and concern. You all rock at CronoMeter. 👍👍👍🤠

  • edited July 2018

    There is no correlation between saturated fats and coronary heart disease
    Study

    There's a lot of so-called professionals out there using antiquated or outright bad science, regurgitating what the media has been pushing for the past 30 years.

    Healthy, non-trans-fats do not kill you, do not increase your risk of heart disease, and in fact reverse blood pressure issues and encourage weight loss through low carb eating.

  • @ThrivesOnNeglect

    Thanks for sharing this article! Just to clarify one piece:

    "Replacing SAFA by cis-polyunsaturated fatty acids was associated with significant CHD risk reduction, which was confirmed by randomized controlled trials."

    Essentially, what this is saying is that by replacing saturated with unsaturated fats, there was a significant reduction in coronary heart disease.

    All in all, what we are seeing is that the overall pattern of what an individual eats is more important than the individual parts. Saturated fat, when consumed as part of a balanced, unprocessed diet, isn't harmful to health, but neither are carbohydrates (provided these carbohydrates are from unprocessed, whole grains).

    Kind regards,

    Susan Macfarlane, MScA, RD
    Registered Dietitian Nutritionist
    cronometer.com
    As always, any and all postings here are covered by our T&Cs:
    https://forums.cronometer.com/discussion/27/governing-terms-and-disclaimer

  • edited July 2018

    Thanks for your response @Susan_RD_101 .

    For me, when a manufacturer utters the magic phrase "whole grains," angel choirs don't sing, a light from above doesn't illuminate the product, and it doesn't suddenly become healthy for me. It's marketing and based on the demonstrably bad SAD diet. I played with words there, but you'll understand. This same diet has, from around 1984, taken a relatively healthy population and made them obese. The same fear of fat and encouragement of carbs is led by the USFDA who are, of course, pocketed by pig pharma - so it all makes sense in the end. Stay fat, get unhealthy, rely on us to fix you. To make matters worse, the indoctrination has become so endemic within the dietary world that even doctors and diet advice gurus are passing on the wrong message.

    Call me tinfoil, but I don't trust drug companies to tell me what my diet should consist of, especially when they are willing to hand out fliers of which carbs Diabetics should consume.

    I can't tell anyone how to live their life, but I won't let bad or deceiving information float around with at least some contention.

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