Why are carbs counted in foods with more grams of fibre than carbs? (Keto diet)

Hello,
I'm following a vegan keto diet. I've seen from several sources that leafy greens like kale, spinach, brocolli and other high fibre plant foods like mushrooms should not count towards your daily carb intake as the fibre content is greater than the carbohydrate content, effectively making them zero net carbs (or even minus carbs!). However, when I enter these foods into the Cronometer app, they all contain/increase my net carbs. Why is this? Why isn't it zero net carbs? (I have the app set to the Keto profile btw). Thanks!

Best Answer

Answers

  • @Trying2Heal

    Hello!

    I think that there may be some misinformation here. While these foods contain few carbs and a good amount of fibre, none of them will have more fibre than carbs. Personally, I would never count them towards net carbs given that they are such a nutritious part of your diet. :)

    Kind regards,

    Susan Macfarlane, MScA, RD
    Registered Dietitian Nutritionist
    cronometer.com
    As always, any and all postings here are covered by our T&Cs:
    https://forums.cronometer.com/discussion/27/governing-terms-and-disclaimer

  • Hi !
    I never heard of "minus carbs". :smile: If a food has a nutrient, it has it, you have nothing to do about it. Fiber can not cancel the carbohydrates, as far as I know. You were misinformed.

    I apologise for my misspellings, as English is not my native language.

  • @Susan_RD_101
    Hi Susan, thanks for your response. On the nutritional information of food packaging, there are various foods (in the UK) that list a higher fibre content than carbohydrate content in grams (asparagus, mushrooms, kale, brocolli etc). Are you saying this is inaccurate labelling? Why would the information be displayed in that way? Is it a misrepresentation in some sense? Or is there something I don't know about when it comes to the figures typically stated? Is there something different about UK labelling perhaps?

    It seems to be common in keto circles to discount foods that have a higher fibre content than carb content because of the net carb calculations. I'd really like to understand this because it makes a significant difference to my carb intake if foods with a higher fibre to carb ratio can be negated. On the other hand, if this is some sort of labelling trick and foods cannot have more fibre than carbs, I'd like to know/understand how that works too! :). Thanks, I really appreciate your time :).

  • Now I understand what you are saying. When you say "carbs", you think at total carbs (including fiber), but I use "carbs" only for net carbs. Of course, a food can not have more fiber than total carbs, because fiber is a part of total carbs. Total carbs = fiber + starch + sugars. So you can never have negative net carbs.
    I am not on ketogenic diet on Cronometer and I also have Net Carbs in my diary. This is shown for every people, because fiber don't count as a carbohydrate in any diet.

    I apologise for my misspellings, as English is not my native language.

  • Nutritional information for the foods you listed (and probably for all foods) may have higher fiber content than carbs, but those carbs are net carbs, so you can not substract fibre from them.

    I apologise for my misspellings, as English is not my native language.

  • @Trying2Heal I wonder if UK food labelling is the same as Australia, where we don't include fibre content in the carb count, meaning that the carb on the label is net carb? When I create a food on Cronometer, I always add carb+fibre on the food label to use for the total carb number.

    #AllTheDots

  • @Marus @Vickie Ah, I see! So, just looking on the back of a pack of avocados as an example, it says:
    Per 100g
    Carbohydrate 1.9g
    Of which sugars 0.5g
    Fibre 3.4g

    So the 1.9 carbohydrate would be the net carbs and the total carb is presumeably 1.9g + 3.4g?

    Well, it's rather annoying/confusing that they don't state that it's net carbs on the packaging! Good thing I've been using the generic USDA database on the cronometer app most of the time and not been going by the packaging!

    Thanks :).

  • Yes, that's it ! :smile:
    For me, it has never been confusing, because they list Fibre separately. If the "carbohydrates" would have been "total carbs", they should have written:
    Carbohydrate 5.3g
    - Of which sugars 0.5g
    - Of which fibre 3.4g

    I apologise for my misspellings, as English is not my native language.

  • Thank you to @Marus and @Vickie for responding to this!

    Hope this clears this up for you @Trying2Heal but let us know if you have any other questions. :)

    Susan Macfarlane, MScA, RD
    Registered Dietitian Nutritionist
    cronometer.com
    As always, any and all postings here are covered by our T&Cs:
    https://forums.cronometer.com/discussion/27/governing-terms-and-disclaimer

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