buckwheat groats, cooked, not roasted

I typically eat cooked buckwheat groats that are not the roasted kind. The roasted is called "kasha." Cronometer lists buckwheat groats, dry which appears to be uncooked buckwheat groats and another listing for buckwheat groats, roasted, cooked. I don't see buckwheat groats, not roasted, cooked. Am I missing it? Other buckwheat entries don't appear to be what I'm looking for, either. Thanks!

Comments

  • Hi Anonymoose2,

    We have 'Buckwheat' in our database from the USDA which is the whole grain, dehydrated but not heat treated, uncooked, with seed, skin and germ present. However, I don't see the nutrient information for buckwheat, cooked from USDA.

    It looks like 'Buckwheat Groats, Dry" from NCCDB is nutrition information for roasted groats, uncooked.

    Here is a side-by-side comparison of both for 100 g:

    Is it a brand name product that you are eating? If you have a label handy we could compare the nutrition information to the NCCDB and USDA foods.

    Best,

    Karen Stark
    cronometer.com
    As always, any and all postings here are covered by our T&Cs:
    https://forums.cronometer.com/discussion/27/governing-terms-and-disclaimer

  • My porridge has been half buckwheat and half steel cut oats for a year or so. Like the two labels pictured above, whether you call it dry buckwheat, roasted groats, or kasha, nutritionally the differences don't matter. The stuff I buy is always labeled kasha and imported from Russia or one of the neighboring Eastern European countries cuz thats whuts fer sale. Unless you want to pay five or ten times as much for the same thing from a health food specialist.

    "Eat food, not too much, mostly plants." Michael Pollan

  • Thank you Karen and Old Hobo,
    Yeah, I buy bulk organic buckwheat groats at the health food store. It sounds like I'll get pretty accurate information if I just select the cooked kasha. I looked at how the cooked kasha numbers relate to the uncooked and they're similar if you account for the water. I know some people use dry buckwheat in granola or raw foods but I'm surprised the cooked version isn't in the USDA database.

Sign In or Register to comment.