Extremely high targets for protein?

edited April 22 in Begin Here

Cronometer seems to have extremely high targets for protein, like WAY too high. Higher than most things I'm reading when I Google it.

For example, THIS article https://muscleevo.net/how-much-protein-build-muscle/ says that 0.7g per lb of body weight is the goal.

I can't really figure out how Cronometer computes their protein recommendation -- something about BMI...?

Anyone have the skinny?

Comments

  • Cronometer is to be seen as a tool to track consumption and all targets we have set by default are not for everyone. If you have different needs you are welcome to make the changes based on your healthcare professional's recommendation or personal preference.
    Targets are by default set to RDA Values by default, however you can edit them as you choose.
    Make sure you have set up your profile with the appropriate age, sex, weight, height, and activity level settings to ensure accurate target calculations.

    Hilary
    cronometer.com
    As always, any and all postings here are covered by our T&Cs:
    https://forums.cronometer.com/discussion/27/governing-terms-and-disclaimer

  • @Andromedus

    The RDA for protein is 0.8 g of protein per kilogram of healthy body weight per day. Athletes may need slightly above this (usually in the range of 1.2-1.7 g per kg per day). Generally speaking, higher protein targets may be suggested to help with weight loss since the macronutrient is more filling than carbs or fat.

    Kind regards,

    Susan Macfarlane, MScA, RD
    Registered Dietitian Nutritionist
    cronometer.com
    As always, any and all postings here are covered by our T&Cs:
    https://forums.cronometer.com/discussion/27/governing-terms-and-disclaimer

  • Yeah, that's what I'm saying; Cronometer's settings for protein are way higher than the RDA. Example: I weigh 131 pounds, so the requirement for "sedentary" would be 47.2g according to the "0.8 g of protein per kilogram" recommendation that you mentioned. However, Cronometer's requirement is 112g.

    I'm working hard to get my daily protein requirements and it would really help me to understand this discrepency.

  • Hello @Andromedus ,

    It sounds like you might have a Macro Ratio set under your Macronutrient settings.

    If you want to use the RDA determined by the USDA, you can set your Macronutrient Targets to Fixed.

    https://cronometer.zendesk.com/hc/en-us/articles/360018362851-Edit-Macronutrient-Targets

    The RDA for Protein that we use when set to Fixed target can be found here: http://www.nationalacademies.org/hmd/~/media/Files/Activity Files/Nutrition/DRI-Tables/8_Macronutrient Summary.pdf?la=en

    Please let me know if you have any questions.

    Marie-Eve
    cronometer.com
    As always, any and all postings here are covered by our T&Cs:
    https://forums.cronometer.com/discussion/27/governing-terms-and-disclaimer

  • Oh, thank you Marie. That helps. :)

  • Yes you can adjust targets and actually i find am I I have been exceeding my 50 grams of protein even as a vegan. My kidney test (creatine) is abnormal & it unable to process all the waste. High protein and phosphorus are hard onkidneys.

  • On April 29 Susan wrote, "The RDA for protein is 0.8 g of protein per kilogram of healthy body weight per day."

    My present weight is a little over 250 lbs or 113kg. My ideal weight is in the neighborhood of 160 lbs or 73kg. So doesn't that make my RDA of protein a little less than 60 grams? And if so, can someone please explain why Cronometer and MFP insist on setting my protein target almost double that number. Because it sure seems like the programs are basing protein requirements on actual not healthy or ideal body weight.

    "Eat food, not too much, mostly plants." Michael Pollan

  • On April 30, Marie_Eve_H wrote:
    "The RDA for Protein that we use when set to Fixed target can be found here: http://www.nationalacademies.org/hmd/~/media/Files/Activity Files/Nutrition/DRI-Tables/8_Macronutrient Summary.pdf?la=en

    Please let me know if you have any questions."

    That link returns the following error message from nationalacademies.org:

    File Not Found

    You have requested a page that does not exist. The link you followed may be outdated or inaccurate. You can try to find similar information via our Search Engine, visit one of the sections listed below, or return to the homepage.

    "Eat food, not too much, mostly plants." Michael Pollan

  • I'm sorry. Changed to fixed targets. Problem solved.

    "Eat food, not too much, mostly plants." Michael Pollan

  • Hi @OldHobo

    While the RDA is 0.8 g of protein per kg per day for healthy (ideal) body weight, there are some instances where higher protein can be helpful, namely when losing weight and for athletes.

    Let me know if you have any follow-up questions!

    Kind regards,

    Susan Macfarlane, MScA, RD
    Registered Dietitian Nutritionist
    cronometer.com
    As always, any and all postings here are covered by our T&Cs:
    https://forums.cronometer.com/discussion/27/governing-terms-and-disclaimer

  • Hi back @Susan_RD_101

    Thank you for permission to follow up.

    First of all, setting aside temporarily those instances that are the exception, are you saying that the RDA is 0.8g of protein per kg per day for those people whose actual weight is a healthy (ideal) body weight, but that recommendation does not apply to obese individuals? Or are you saying that the RDA for obese individuals is 0.8g of protein per kg per day of what their healthy (ideal) body weight would be, as long as they are not athletes or losing weight?

    For the sake of clarity could we establish that answer before venturing into how those named exceptional circumstances alter the recommendation?

    "Eat food, not too much, mostly plants." Michael Pollan

  • @OldHobo

    The RDA of 0.8 g of protein applies to individuals at a "normal" BMI (i.e. between 18.5 and 24.9 kg/msq) and those considered "overweight" or "obese" by BMI categories.

    However, when it comes to individuals in the "overweight" and "obese" category, we want to calcualte protein needs at an ideal body weight (which I calculate in the following way):

    Ideal weight= 24.9 x height (meters) squared
    Protein needs: ideal weight x 0.8 g

    From there, I will add on additional protein on an as-needed basis.

    Hope this helps!

    Susan Macfarlane, MScA, RD
    Registered Dietitian Nutritionist
    cronometer.com
    As always, any and all postings here are covered by our T&Cs:
    https://forums.cronometer.com/discussion/27/governing-terms-and-disclaimer

  • @Susan_RD_101

    Ms. Susan, thank you. It absolutely helps. So, done the math and checked it thrice.
    My ideal weight is 182 lbs. and based solely on height and weight a generic RDA of protein is 66 grams.

    I'm 67, sedentary, and losing one to two pounds per week. Current BMI is 34.1. My hunch is that the effect of these factors on protein requirements is not so mathematical. I going to work my way back up to a light to moderate level of exercise and establish a minimum daily protein target of 75 grams, aiming for three meals of 25 to 30 grams each.

    Without trying to take advantage of you by wrangling free professional advice, if you see faults in my understanding or strategic flaws in this approach please let me know.

    Thanks again.

    "Eat food, not too much, mostly plants." Michael Pollan

  • @OldHobo

    I'm here to help! And your exactly right; our nutrition needs are as much of an art as they are a science. Given your age, weight loss goals, and desire to resume activity, my recommendation would be to aim for the 25-30 g (higher end may be better - more satiating) at each meal and try to include snacks with 5-10 g of protein if you are going more than 3-4 hours between meals.

    Best of luck!

    Susan Macfarlane, MScA, RD
    Registered Dietitian Nutritionist
    cronometer.com
    As always, any and all postings here are covered by our T&Cs:
    https://forums.cronometer.com/discussion/27/governing-terms-and-disclaimer

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