Wrong database nutrient content for the cod liver in its own oil

Hi, why is the cod liver in its own oil so low in nutrients (zero Omega 3 !?, zero vitamin D !?) in your database when it is widely known to contain many critical nutrients?
Thank you.

Cristian

Comments

  • Hi @Cristian

    @Hilary or @Marie_Eve_H might be able to explain better, but it can often be because of what information is included on the label. I'd advise putting in 'fish oil, cod liver oil', which has a more accurate report for nutrients.

    Thanks!

    Susan Macfarlane, MScA, RD
    Registered Dietitian Nutritionist
    cronometer.com
    As always, any and all postings here are covered by our T&Cs:
    https://forums.cronometer.com/discussion/27/governing-terms-and-disclaimer

  • Hi Susan,

    It is true that most nutrient information is found for cod liver oil but I actually need the nutrient information for canned cod liver in its own oil. It can't be that much of a difference though between the cod liver oil and the canned cod liver in its own oil.
    Thanks anyway.
    Cristian

  • edited December 2017

    "Threeline Imports, Cod Liver, In Own Oil" is a branded, user submitted food item in our database. As we are not a laboratory, we are unable to measure specific levels of nutrients, so we rely on the values given on the packaging.
    The best data you will find will come from our NCCDB and USDA Sources. These sources have tested foods in Laboratories or gathered information from credible sources to determine complete nutrient profiles. In this case, we do not have data from a good source for a complete nutrient profile.
    If you know the values for a specific food item, you can create a custom food for yourself, however as these values would be unverifiable, we are unable to add them to our public database. You can add custom foods by following these steps: https://cronometer.com/help/foods/#addfood. You can scan the barcode with our barcode scanner feature in the mobile app which makes creating the custom food and submitting a bit easier. Scan the barcode of your product using your iOS app, and then select the orange "+" at the bottom of the home screen, then select "Scan a Barcode" and follow the steps provided on your app.

    Hilary
    cronometer.com
    As always, any and all postings here are covered by our T&Cs:
    https://forums.cronometer.com/discussion/27/governing-terms-and-disclaimer

  • I have a similar issue. Wild caught sockeye salmon has zero values for Omega 3 and B12 (at least). How can this be corrected?

  • "Wild Caught Sockeye Salmon" Food #3021915, Data Source: USDAWeb:45284386 is a user submitted food from a database that is not first reviewed by Cronometer's Curation team. To make sure you are getting the Best data, try choosing food items from NCCDB, or USDA databases for generic products, and if you need to use a branded product try to source it from the CRDB Database. Have a look at our Blog post on getting the most out of Cronometer to learn how to make good choices when choosing data! https://cronometer.com/blog/6-tips-getting-nutrition-data/

    Hilary
    cronometer.com
    As always, any and all postings here are covered by our T&Cs:
    https://forums.cronometer.com/discussion/27/governing-terms-and-disclaimer

  • Yes to the link @Hilary posted. Cronometer has given us a great indicator to decide which search result to use as the entry. When your search results come up, click or tap on the entries of interest and compare the total number of "listed nutrients". The more the usually better.

    I have personally chosen food entries with fewer listed nutrients because they have the ones I'm more interested in (e.g. omega 3 and omega 6 content).

    #AllTheDots

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