Vegan weight loss

I've been using Cronometer on and off to try and loss weight and to keep myself accountable on what I really eat throughout. I've been vegan for a year enjoy it very much. Being vegan comes easy to me now and that is not the problem, but the hard part as with any diet/ lifestyle change is staying away from the junk food. I've struggled with my weight most of my life and since going vegan I have stayed about the same weight because it is still very easy to eat out and junk foods. I know I feel great when I eat plant based vegan vs. junk food vegan. Anyone else struggling with this vegan or not? _
Also if you are vegan how do you set up your carb/ protein/ fat ratios, since vegan diets tend to be higher in carbs than others.
I'd love to talk with some other vegans on how you uose Cronometer and your weight loss journey.

«1

Comments

  • I've been using cronometer on and off for three years and tried to find out which macro settings helped me most to feel satisfied. Now I just ignore them and I find that it may well be fibre content and nutrient density that make me happy.
    The only drawback about whole food plant based is that almost everything has to be cooked from scratch.

    I went vegan for my health, but it took me at least half a year - a very mature organic goat cheese and milk chocolate kept me back... During that transition time it suddenly occured to me that my health might greatly improve if I not only gave up all animal food, but also cigarettes.

    My health improved indeed, but alas, weightloss turned into weightgain. At first I did not mind so much, because I felt so great without the coughing. Just when I was ready to tackle my extra weight I was confronted with some gnarly relationship issues. Now I have dealt with them I really need to get rid of my extra weight.

  • @nommh

    Congratulations on quitting smoking! This is by far, the best thing you can do for your health. :smiley: Unfortunately, weight gain is a common side effect of quitting smoking since cigarettes can suppress appetite, dull our taste buds (so food tastes bland) and potentially alter our metabolism.

    The two most important nutrients when trying to lose weight are fibre and protein. I'd suggest making sure you are including a source of plant-based protein at each meal and snack, which will help to keep you full for longer.

    Keep up the great work!

    Susan Macfarlane, MScA, RD
    Registered Dietitian Nutritionist
    cronometer.com
    As always, any and all postings here are covered by our T&Cs:
    https://forums.cronometer.com/discussion/27/governing-terms-and-disclaimer

  • Hello

    I am a new vegan (wished I'd done it years ago) and loving it. I have struggled with my weight for the last few years due to menopause and underactive thyroid and faddy diets. I changed to vegetarian in May (to support my young daughter) and then gradually changed to a vegan lifestyle.

    I have noticed that what I thought was a wheat intolerance may have been a dairy intolerance as my bloated abdomen has disappeared and I can actually see a difference in my shape which is really encouraging. I do 3 HIIT sessions a week and run once a week and feel like I have a new lease of life.

    I just need to make sure I am hitting all my nutrient needs which is why I joined cronometer to see where I am. I need to increase my protein.

    Hope to share ideas along the way!

  • @Indianna

    Thanks for sharing! I'm also a big fan of eating whole foods plant based.

    I actually find that most people have some degree of lactose intolerance, especially as they age. For a lot of people, removing (or at least cutting back on) dairy can have huge improvements in gut health, although everyone is somewhat individual.

    Good luck on your plant-based diet!

    Susan Macfarlane, MScA, RD
    Registered Dietitian Nutritionist
    cronometer.com
    As always, any and all postings here are covered by our T&Cs:
    https://forums.cronometer.com/discussion/27/governing-terms-and-disclaimer

  • I started vegan early in the year, but found I feel much better completely raw, low fat. I follow the 80/10/10 cpf guidelines as that's what works best. I still eat a little processed, gluten free, vegan junk, and beans and rice about one meal per week. I keep that to Sunday dinner so I can go to bed early, because anything cooked just knocks my butt out (this dinner is really for my family which is a little slower on the transition path). Otherwise, I'd call it 95% raw. My macros sometimes go over those ten percent portions, but often they're lower so it evens out.

    It helps when you associate how crappy you feel with the junk that causes it. I depend on my energy level staying high and even the entire day. When I feel badly I really notice it. After a while, I just didn't want to eat that much junk or cooked food.

    It also helps to grow a garden. You'd be amazed by how tender broccoli is homegrown. The stalk can be eaten completely fresh with no preparation whatsoever, it's like eating a green bean, crisp and easy. Maybe it's because I used heirloom seeds? Maybe because I never used any kind of spray whatsoever? I don't know. Tomatoes and cucumbers and everything else are also leaps above what I find even in whole foods. And the greens are actually sweet. So I eat a lot more of my daily calories from a particular plant when it's from the garden, for sure.

  • Sorry, forgot to add that I lost thirty pounds petty quickly, and now my weight is holding steady but my shape keeps changing for the better- generally in the size 4-6 range. I walk and run 6 days a week and do gymnastic bodies, calisthenics or weight training most weekdays as well.

    I eat raw fresh fruits and veg until I'm satisfied, every meal and every day. This averages to about 2200 calories according to cronometer (2700 yesterday, I was starving the whole day, lol). As long as I have the energy I need and I'm making progress in both my workouts and body shape, I usually just call their proposed number a bare minimum, because on average I'm losing weight, even with lots of extra calories.

    I'm waiting with bated breath for them to update their algorithm from the super annoying calories in/ calories out model to the macros vs fat loss or muscle gain model... any minute now...

  • @floridavegan

    Thanks for sharing! It seems that you have found a good rhythm and way of eating that supports your needs and health goals. :smile: I agree, food from the garden tastes best.

    Also, regarding your feature request, you may wish to post it on the relevant thread for the developers to see. Cronometer is always adding cool features and upgrades based on user feedback.

    Kind regards,

    Susan Macfarlane, MScA, RD
    Registered Dietitian Nutritionist
    cronometer.com
    As always, any and all postings here are covered by our T&Cs:
    https://forums.cronometer.com/discussion/27/governing-terms-and-disclaimer

  • Hi all!
    I was reading your comments and maybe you can help or have advice.

    I mostly vegan and have troubles losing weight. I track my calorie intake and make sure it's below 1400cals (recommendation for my body 1100-1400 for weight loss). I've been doing this for 8 weeks now and not much has changed, although it has in the past. I exercise twice a week and have a waiting job, so it's not like I am standing still.

    I also started thinking that I might be eating too much fruit throughout the day, but from your comments I see that it worked even with a high-calorie intake (although exercising). Is too much fruit possible? What's the impact of carbs from fruit and veggies on the average intake?

    Maybe I am asking the wrong questions, or my stats and recommended intakes aren't well calculated for me personally. I'd like to get this assessed professionally, but would prefer online experts, since I live in a small place without services of this kind.
    Can you recommend someone?

    Thank you!

  • I think it can depend on how you use your so-called 'junk' foods. For example we have burgers once a week. I buy frozen soy based burgers from the supermarket, bake them as per the instructions, pop them in toasted wholewheat buns along with lots of lettuce, tomato, onion and pickles and serve with a modest side of oven baked potato wedges and some tangy homemade slaw or a bit of corn on the cob. This kind of 'junk food' fits easily into my daily calorie allowance while also making me feel like I've had a nice treat (especially at the weekend or on a Friday night). When I make a black bean chilli (all whole food) I serve it with a small weighed (1 oz) handful of tortilla chips. Yes they have some fat and salt in them, but they really do add something special to the chilli. How about trying to work a bit of junk food into your weekly menus. Don't make it a 'taboo' or a 'no go'.

  • Hi @emsi ,

    You should be able to connect with a Registered Dietitian, even in your small area, since we work everywhere. Alternatively, many dietitians also provide online support through email/Skype.

    Reasons why I find my clients are losing weight when sticking to the plan are:
    1. Under-reporting of calories
    2. Over-reporting of activity
    3. Over-restriction of calories
    4. Frequent restaurant meals or liquid calories

    Although many people will debate otherwise, calories are more important than macronutrients when it comes to weight loss. Provided you are eating less than your maintenance calories, you will lose weight.

    However, I would work on increasing both the fibre and protein in your diet, as this tends to help my vegan clients to feel more full for longer and results in overall lower calories.

    Lastly, remember that it takes a 500 calorie restriction from maintenance calories to lose 1 lb per week. This may not show up on a scale for a number of reasons (ranging from hydration status, to timing of last BM, to time of the month). I would look at 4 week trends in your weight measurements as it's possible you are losing weight and just not noticing it.

    Kind regards,

    Susan Macfarlane, MScA, RD
    Registered Dietitian Nutritionist
    cronometer.com
    As always, any and all postings here are covered by our T&Cs:
    https://forums.cronometer.com/discussion/27/governing-terms-and-disclaimer

  • Thanks @Susan_RD_101.
    So the calorie restriction is deducted from my estimated BMR?

    Can the intake be higher when I exercise that day and therefore have burned more? I guess that's what Cronometer calculates and updates where it says "You can eat .... more today".
    It is recommendable to stay under the maximum intake if the body doesn't request more energy after exercise?

  • Hi @emsi ,

    What I do as a dietitian is determine a client's:
    1) Maintenance calories
    2) 1 lb/week weight loss calories

    In your account settings you can figure this out by putting in your weight and height, along with your average activity. If you are exercising 3 x per week, choose light active, 5x per week, choose moderate active, and 5-7 days per week, choose very active.

    Your BMR is then your maintenance calories. Eating 500 less than this per day is the target you want to lose 1 lb per week.

    To be honest, I treat the calories burned from exercise as "extras" and don't encourage people to eat above their maintenance calories, even when they exercise. I find that doing so causes people to overeat and feel they need to "reward" activity.

    Hope this helps!

    Susan Macfarlane, MScA, RD
    Registered Dietitian Nutritionist
    cronometer.com
    As always, any and all postings here are covered by our T&Cs:
    https://forums.cronometer.com/discussion/27/governing-terms-and-disclaimer

  • That answers my questions perfectly. Thanks so much!

    I also agree on not eating over the maintenance, no matter if I burned more for a day.
    I am now more strict on my calorie restriction and set a definite daily intake goal. I increased fat and protein intake, which automatically increases my fiber, and lowered fructose and therefore carbs and am starting to see the difference now.

    Now I just need to stick to it.

    Thanks for your help @Susan_RD_101 !

  • @emsi

    No worries. :smile:

    Susan Macfarlane, MScA, RD
    Registered Dietitian Nutritionist
    cronometer.com
    As always, any and all postings here are covered by our T&Cs:
    https://forums.cronometer.com/discussion/27/governing-terms-and-disclaimer

  • edited January 2018

    Hi @Susan_RD_101
    When you calculate maintenance calories, don't you take activity/exercise into account? As in "lightly active" or do you then assume everyone sedentary, and if they do burn through activity, don't add calories?

    I find that my maintenance is around what CRON estimates for me as a "lightly active" person, but I frequently burn 400 more according to my fitbit HR. Still, while that's supposed to be accurate, eating that much actually causes gain.

    Thank you for clarifying!
    Posi

  • edited January 2018

    @posi , if you have a fitbit device synced to Cronometer that measures your daily activity, make sure your activity level on Cronometer is set to "None" so that you don't double count your daily activity!
    See https://cronometer.com/help/profile/#activity for more information on how to choose an appropriate activity level for your purposes!

    Hilary
    cronometer.com
    As always, any and all postings here are covered by our T&Cs:
    https://forums.cronometer.com/discussion/27/governing-terms-and-disclaimer

  • @Hilary thank you- I do have it set to zero it was only me noticing that set to none and using fitbit data is less accurate/effective for me than not importing the data and using the preset activity levels

  • @posi

    To be honest, I actually ignore what fitbit says and like to calculate energy needs using someone's current body weight and average daily level (or weekly level) of activity. You could also look at your 'Basal Metabolic Rate' or BMR as I use this number as an indicator of where to set my lower calorie limit (i.e. calorie intake should be around, but not below, this number for weight loss).

    Let me know if you have any follow-up questions!

    Susan Macfarlane, MScA, RD
    Registered Dietitian Nutritionist
    cronometer.com
    As always, any and all postings here are covered by our T&Cs:
    https://forums.cronometer.com/discussion/27/governing-terms-and-disclaimer

  • Hi there, eating a balanced diet including green vegetables and fruits can be the best option for maintaining weight. I am overweight and trying to lose my weight while discussing with my friend, he suggested me to visit this page which provides the best way to maintain weight.

  • Hi there, eating a balanced diet including green vegetables and fruits can be the best option for maintaining weight. I am overweight and trying to lose my weight while discussing with my friend, he suggested me to visit this page which provides the best way to maintain weight.

  • I'm new to this site but have been vegan for about 3 years, vegetarian for over 5 years. I initially lost about 15 pounds going vegan from vegetarian, only to eventually gain it back after falling into the vegan junk food trap, lol. I eat several times a day now and for snacks I eat low calorie fruits like watermelon, cantaloupe, grapes, etc. I have also significantly increased my vegetable consumption which is also low calorie and filling. So far I have lost several pounds within just a week or so. I noticed that it was easier to cut my calories by adding more fruit and veggies into my diet. I don't every feel hungry or deprived.

  • @Miko

    You bring up such an important topic; processed food is processed food. When I first went vegan 9 years ago, there was only one way to eat vegan. Nowadays, there is so much vegan junk food given that veganism is trending. While I'm happy about this from an ethical and environmental standpoint, I'm concerned about the health fallout.

    All this to say, great job for turning things around for yourself!

    Susan Macfarlane, MScA, RD
    Registered Dietitian Nutritionist
    cronometer.com
    As always, any and all postings here are covered by our T&Cs:
    https://forums.cronometer.com/discussion/27/governing-terms-and-disclaimer

  • i want to know what is meant by 'junk foods' - would the fake cheeses, fake sausage, seitan, etc, count as 'junk vegan'? Or only for instance the fig newtons, almond ice cream and skittles?

    I am more plant based/vegan-ish and the ratio i most like is 80 10 10 mainly because i'm moderating my fat intake, so the protein thing is all over the map but the fat i tend to keep at 10 - 15%

    i lost a huge amount of weight for me in the last year thanks to adopting plant based low fat high carb with only minor fluctuations that came from a few months of inattetion and going back to mock dairy/mock meats. I am feeling the creep again and may dial down even these foods and just go to grains, veg, etc.

  • @ahorrasi

    A good way to determine if a food is processed or not is by looking at the ingredient list. The longer it is, the more it is processed (and the more fat, sugar, and salt is typically added). In a plant-based diet, vegan "junk food" tends to slip in as the alternatives to omnivore products (e.g. vegan pizza, vegan chicken wings, vegan ice cream, etc.). Choose more tofu/tempeh, legumes, and seitan (that you make yourself) as your main protein sources. I like to use the 80/20 rule in my practice where 80% of your diet comes from whole, unprocessed plant-based foods; 20% can come from these more processed products. :)

    Congratulations on your weight loss!

    Kind regards,

    Susan Macfarlane, MScA, RD
    Registered Dietitian Nutritionist
    cronometer.com
    As always, any and all postings here are covered by our T&Cs:
    https://forums.cronometer.com/discussion/27/governing-terms-and-disclaimer

  • So interesting reading this. I am really liking vegan Keto. I have clinical depression. I feel less anxious about what to eat. I feel clear, clean and a wee bit more energy. I like feeling sated and not wanting junk food and carbs every 3hours. Kale and avocados.

  • @Sassafras_333

    Happy to hear that you are feeling better!

    There is no one right diet for each person; the best diet will be the one you can follow for the rest of your life and it sounds like you have a good rhythm going. :)

    Susan Macfarlane, MScA, RD
    Registered Dietitian Nutritionist
    cronometer.com
    As always, any and all postings here are covered by our T&Cs:
    https://forums.cronometer.com/discussion/27/governing-terms-and-disclaimer

  • Hi! Since joining chronometer in July I have had success in losing weight on a WFPB diet, with 20% fat, 60% carbs, 20% protein. I have set my weight loss goal to 1/2 lb per week (daily kcal deficit 250). I was surprised to lose actually 1 lb per week with this, even with accounting for 30 min exercise walk daily (for which I added the lost kcal to my food.) I am even more surprised now that with staying in this range, not adding any junk food etc., eating pretty much the same like before, I have now for the last 3 weeks gained back 2 lb! What could be the explanation for this? I am 71 years old, moderately active.

  • edited October 2018

    Weight can change as much as 5 pounds from water and the 'status' of your digestive tract...But not an actual change in body fat....

    here my weight graph from july 1st, till now...

    I am an amateur. I've been using CRON-O-Meter for 9 years and still learning.....

«1
Sign In or Register to comment.